Par3golfer's Blog


Those Pesky Ball Marks!

Ball marks are those indentations from where the ball hits the green from a your shot (from the air). A ball mark can cause the grass in the depression to die, leaving not just a scar but also a pit in the putting surface that can knock   well-struck putts offline. Repairing a ball mark restores a smooth surface and helps keep the grass healthy.   Sometimes, people accidentally incorrectly repair ball marks, simply because they don’t know the proper technique.

Unfortunately, “repairing” a ball mark incorrectly can actually cause more damage.  Incorrectly “repaired” ball marks take up to twice as long to heal as those that are properly repaired. So please help repair the ball marks and take care of the greens for everyone. And if you have a minute, and there isn’t another group of golfers behind you please feel free to fix one or two other ball marks, too, if you find more of them on the green!

Repairing ball marks isn’t just important for the health of the greens, and for smooth-rolling putts. It isn’t just a matter of golf etiquette. It is our obligation to help take care of the golf courses we play. And repairing ball marks is a big part of that obligation to the game. The ball mark repair tool is the right tool for the job of repairing ball marks. The tool should be familiar to every golfer; it’s a simple tool, just two prongs on the end of a piece of metal or hard plastic. If you don’t have one, please stop in the pro shot and there are tools for sale. There are some new ball mark repair tools on the market, but the jury is still out on whether any of them really do a better job at helping greens heal than the standard, old-fashioned tool you will find in most pro shops.

To properly repair ball marks, please follow the steps below.

STEP 1:

Take your ball mark repair tool and insert the prongs into the turf at the edge of the depression. Do NOT insert the prongs into the depression itself, but at the edge of the depression.

STEP 2:

The next step is to push the edge of the ball mark toward the center, using your ball mark repair tool in a “gentle twisting motion,” in the words of the GCSAA. This is the step where some well meaning golfers might mess up. Many golfers believe the way to “fix” a ball mark is to insert  the tool at an angle, so the prongs are beneath the center of the crater, and then to use the tool as a lever to push the bottom of the ball mark back up even with the surface. Do not do this! Pushing the bottom of the depression upward only tears the roots, and kills the grass.

Just use your ball mark repair tool to work around the rim of the crater, pushing the grass at the edge toward the center of the depression. One way to envision this is to picture reaching down with your thumb and forefinger on opposite sides of the ball mark and “pinching” those sides together.

STEP 3:

Once you’ve worked around the rim of the ball mark with your repair tool, pushing the grass toward the center, there’s only one thing left to do: Gently tamp down the repaired ball mark with your putter or foot to smooth the putting surface.

That’s that! You have repaired the ball mark correctly! If you are unsure, or need more help with this, please ask one of our staff members. They play the Par 3 often and would be more than happy to help you learn how to fix ball marks the right way!

On behalf of everyone at the Par 3, thanks!

Rick Jones

Cape May Par 3 & Driving Range

Dover Par 3 & Driving Range



Oh Balls!!

We all think about clubs as we play golf– but what about the balls?? Every year, golf ball manufacturers research and develop all different kinds of golf balls to improve the game. When you are spending your hard earned $$s on golf balls, you want to make sure you buy golf balls that meet your needs. How do you pick out golf balls? Well, there is a general approach I’d like to share with you. Think back on the last few rounds of golf you have played. How did you do? Maybe you noticed your ball moves too far to one side. Your shots might lack distance or fly too low or too high. Or maybe you’re short on the greens.

 If you need more distance:

Choose a golf ball made out of two pieces. Golf balls with two piece construction have a cover and one piece on the inside. if you are looking for more distance and less movement on the ball, this is the right kind of ball. If you read the packaging, it will say: “extra distance” and “low spin” , which tells you that it is a two-piece ball. New golfers often use two-piece balls with very little spin.

 If you need a ball that curves more:

Look for a three-piece ball if you want the ball to curve more and stop faster on the greens. High spin balls also often fly higher in the air. Many three- and four-piece balls are designed to spin less when hit with a driver and spin more when hit with higher lofted clubs around the green. Pretty cool!

My best suggestion is to buy a sleeve of balls of various golf balls. Buy some that are two piece balls and some that are three or four piece construction. Play several rounds of golf using one brand and style of golf ball for each round. Pay attention to how the ball responds to your game. If you find one that works particularly well, you will be set!

Rick Jones

www.capemaypar3.com

www.doverpar3golf.com

www.midwaypar3golf.com