Par3golfer's Blog


Check out this NEW GOLFER Video
September 29, 2013, 7:59 PM
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Top 10 Laws of Golf

Top 10 Laws of Golf!…

Law 10 — A severe slice is a thing of awesome power and beauty.

Law 9 — Golf balls from the same “sleeve” tend to follow one another, particularly out of bounds or into the water

Law 8 — The last three holes of a round will automatically adjust your score to what it really should be.

Law 7 — Every par-three hole in the world has a secret desire to humiliate golfers. The shorter the hole — the greater its desire.

Law 6 – All vows taken on a golf course shall be valid only until the sunset of the same day

Law 5 — Golf balls never bounce off of trees back into play. If one does, the tree is breaking a law of the universe and should be cut down.

Law 4 – The person you would most hate to lose to will always be the one who beats you.

Law 3 – No matter how bad your last shot was, the worst is yet to come. This law does not expire on the 18th hole, since it has the supernatural tendency to extend over the course of your lifetime.

Law 2 — Trees eat golf balls.

Law 1– Your BEST round of golf will be followed almost immediately by your worst round ever. The probability of the latter increases with the number of people you tell about the former.

These are ALLL sooooo true! Hope you enjoyed my list…feel free to post a few of your own!

Rick

Cape May Par 3 & Driving Range

Dover Par 3 & Driving Range



Windy Weather!
December 2, 2011, 1:12 PM
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Hello!

Yesterday, the temperature was warm and the sun was shining—though the wind was blowing a bit. Because golf is played in the elements, there are guidelines that address some aspects of play in the wind. Crazy things can happen in windy weather on the course, and there has to be some way to address it. And, in October of this year, at the end of a 4 year review, the USGA, working with the R&A, updated and changed several important rules– including a rule that addresses the impact of wind.

Here is the updated rule:

Ball Moving After Address (Rule 18-2b). A new exception is added which exonerates the player from penalty if their ball moves after it has been addressed when it is known or virtually certain that they did not cause the ball to move. For example, if it is a gust of wind that moves the ball after it has been addressed, there is no penalty and the ball is played from its new position.

Unfortunately for Nick Watney, these rule changes don’t take effect until January 1, 2012! Yesterday, he was caught in a situation where the old rule was applied and he was penalized a stroke. He addressed the ball, backed up, and watched it move—and was penalized one stroke. Under the new rule, the penalty stroke is NOT assessed if the wind moved the ball after the address. Taking it in stride, Watney remarked, “I might be the last player in history to be penalized under that rule. That could be a trivia question one day.”

Have a wonderful holiday season! I will catch you on the other side of the holidays.

Rick Jones

Cape May Par 3 & Driving Range

Dover Par 3 & Driving Range

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Golf in the Cold Weather
October 28, 2011, 1:24 PM
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Well…the cold weather is here. YUK! I love the fall colors out on the course, and the slight chill in the air makes the  sounds of the leaves blowing in the trees relaxing; but I find myself longing for the warm days of May and June…already. In any case, here we are. So, I wanted to talk to you about golf in the cold weather and the small adjustments that need to be made in the cold weather.

So, a little science lesson will help you understand where I am heading with this…cold air is denser. Have you ever
noticed that the air pressure is higher in your tires during the summer than in the winter? That is because air molecules do not move as much in the cold temperatures as they do in the warmer temperatures. So, cold air is functionally heavier and it creates more resistance on the ball as it travels through the air. The problem for golfers is that many golfers, especially new players, think that simply hitting the ball harder is the answer.  Unfortunately, it leaves you open for more mistakes. Very basically, it causes you to be in the wrong position at the point of impact.

There are a few things you can do to help combat the cold temps on the course:

  • Try to keep your ball warm. Put it in your pocket until you need it.
  • Keep your hands, feet, and head when playing in cold weather. Invest in good gloves! If you are not cold, you will enjoy yourself a lot more—if that is even possible!
  • Work your swing to generate a lower trajectory, and play the ball slightly back in your stance. You will need to change your swing plane to a shallower arc.
  • Drop your right shoulder to lower than your left. From this position the right allows the left to control the takeaway. Lead with the left and follow with the right. Do not let your right shoulder to pass the ball, so that the spin on the ball will be right.

I hope these tips help. The biggest thing is that the cold weather is not the worst thing in the world…you can still get out, play 18 holes, and enjoy the game as always. You will be glad to get the fresh air—and who knows, you might come to enjoy and appreciate the renewed opportunity of  being successful on the course in even the coldest weather!

Rick Jones

par3rick@aol.com

Cape May Par 3 & Driving Range

www.capemaypar3.com

Dover Par 3 & Driving Range

www.doverpar3golf.com



What I’ve got on Golf APPS…

Smartphones are all the rage—if you don’t have one yet (like
me), some people night think you are a dinosaur…also like me! Well, in an
effort to understand all the hubbub about smartphones (Droids or iPhones), I
asked around. I now realize that the applications that smartphones can offer
are so addicting…and helpful! I looked into the applications available for
smartphones that are valuable on the course. I have been thinking of getting a
high tech phone for a while and now…OK. SO—here are some neat Apps with great reviews:

Golf GPS APPS

SkyDroid (http://www.skydroid.net/)

Works with iPhones, iPads, & Droids with 3G Technology

Cost: $1.99

Features: GPS Distance to every green; Distances to water
hazards and bunkers

Pros: Great skycaddie for $2.

Cons: No instructions.

FreeCaddie Golf GPS (http://freecaddie.com/)

Works with most smartphones (incluing Blackberry, iPhones,
Droids, Windows).

Cost: FREE

FreeCaddie Pro Golf GPS is $9.95, and offers additional
capabilities (Not included here).

Features of FreeCaddie: Distance to the font, back, and
center of the green for 1 course. NOTE: The pro edition allows for an unlimited
number of courses.

Pros: #1 for Androids (with 700,000 downloads). There are
over 23,000 mapped courses.

Cons: Free version offers much less than the version that is
$10. Latest update isn’t working for all phones with DroidX technology.

 

Golf Score Card APP

GolfCard Pro (http://www.senygma.com/GolfCard/Home.html)

Works with most spartphones, including iPhones, iPods, and
Droids

Cost: Between $9.99 and $10.99

Features: Scoring, range finder, USGA Handicap Index,
Statistics, and more.

Pros: Great tracking and storage capability

Cons: Account required to use some features, such as adding
a course or uploading scores.

 

 

 

Other applications…

 

The Rules of Golf 

(http://www.usga.org/news/2010/January/USGA-Launches-New-Rules-Of-Golf-Application/)

Presented by the USGA

Works with iPhones, and Droids.

Cost: $3.99

Pros: Offers user the Rules of Golf, in addition to
Decisions on the Rules of Golf and Rules of Amateur Status.

Cons: Small and hard to read.

Golf Channel Mobile (http://www.golfchannel.com/mobile/)

Presented by the Golf Channel

Works with iPhones and Droids.

Cost: FREE

Features: Tournament leaderboards, news and blogs; golf
channel show clips and instructional video; photo galleries and player
profiles; and equipment and travel reviews.

Pros: Handy way to stay on top of all the professional golf
happenings!

Cons: None.

 

 



Those Pesky Ball Marks!

Ball marks are those indentations from where the ball hits the green from a your shot (from the air). A ball mark can cause the grass in the depression to die, leaving not just a scar but also a pit in the putting surface that can knock   well-struck putts offline. Repairing a ball mark restores a smooth surface and helps keep the grass healthy.   Sometimes, people accidentally incorrectly repair ball marks, simply because they don’t know the proper technique.

Unfortunately, “repairing” a ball mark incorrectly can actually cause more damage.  Incorrectly “repaired” ball marks take up to twice as long to heal as those that are properly repaired. So please help repair the ball marks and take care of the greens for everyone. And if you have a minute, and there isn’t another group of golfers behind you please feel free to fix one or two other ball marks, too, if you find more of them on the green!

Repairing ball marks isn’t just important for the health of the greens, and for smooth-rolling putts. It isn’t just a matter of golf etiquette. It is our obligation to help take care of the golf courses we play. And repairing ball marks is a big part of that obligation to the game. The ball mark repair tool is the right tool for the job of repairing ball marks. The tool should be familiar to every golfer; it’s a simple tool, just two prongs on the end of a piece of metal or hard plastic. If you don’t have one, please stop in the pro shot and there are tools for sale. There are some new ball mark repair tools on the market, but the jury is still out on whether any of them really do a better job at helping greens heal than the standard, old-fashioned tool you will find in most pro shops.

To properly repair ball marks, please follow the steps below.

STEP 1:

Take your ball mark repair tool and insert the prongs into the turf at the edge of the depression. Do NOT insert the prongs into the depression itself, but at the edge of the depression.

STEP 2:

The next step is to push the edge of the ball mark toward the center, using your ball mark repair tool in a “gentle twisting motion,” in the words of the GCSAA. This is the step where some well meaning golfers might mess up. Many golfers believe the way to “fix” a ball mark is to insert  the tool at an angle, so the prongs are beneath the center of the crater, and then to use the tool as a lever to push the bottom of the ball mark back up even with the surface. Do not do this! Pushing the bottom of the depression upward only tears the roots, and kills the grass.

Just use your ball mark repair tool to work around the rim of the crater, pushing the grass at the edge toward the center of the depression. One way to envision this is to picture reaching down with your thumb and forefinger on opposite sides of the ball mark and “pinching” those sides together.

STEP 3:

Once you’ve worked around the rim of the ball mark with your repair tool, pushing the grass toward the center, there’s only one thing left to do: Gently tamp down the repaired ball mark with your putter or foot to smooth the putting surface.

That’s that! You have repaired the ball mark correctly! If you are unsure, or need more help with this, please ask one of our staff members. They play the Par 3 often and would be more than happy to help you learn how to fix ball marks the right way!

On behalf of everyone at the Par 3, thanks!

Rick Jones

Cape May Par 3 & Driving Range

Dover Par 3 & Driving Range



Beat the Heat with These 6 Tips!

As the weather heats up, it is important to be more mindful and prepared to play golf. We encourage you to read this list and make any changes that might help you enjoy your time on the golf course even more—as if that’s possible! We ALL wait all winter to be able to get out and hit balls and play a round of golf. Don’t let the heat discourage you from playing golf this summer!! Remember, a hot day on the golf course is still better than a nice day anywhere else! Here are some suggestions we have for ways to beat the heat or be prepared to handle the heat.

Hydrate. Hydration takes place for several days prior to your round of golf. If you golf often, it is important that you make hydration part of your every day routine. While some studies have shown that all drinks hydrate, obviously some are better than others. Water is the best way to get hydrated. Other healthy ways to hydrate yourself are by drinking milk, vegetable and fruit juice. Sports drinks are a good alternative to water if you plan on playing/walking 18 holes.

Wear appropriate clothing. When you are planning what to wear to play golf, make sure to wear light weight, breathable clothing. You will also want to wear light colored clothing, which will not absorb as much heat as darker colored clothes. Oddly enough, it is better to wear an undershirt, which will help wick away sweat and keep you cooler. When possible, wear a visor and not hat. Hats trap heat in and can cause you to be hotter. Stay in the shade and use sunscreen on your scalp when wearing a visor!

Plan your day accordingly. Plan to spend the time outside during the morning and/or evening. Avoid spending time on the course during the middle of the day. You will have a lot more fun, when you are not struggling with the sun and heat. If you can only fit your time on the links in during the middle of the day, be sure to wear a hat that offers coverage, as well as sunscreen!

Stand in the shade.  At Cape May Par 3, there are plenty spots with lots of shade. If you get too hot, have a seat on a bench in the shade. It will make you feel better, and able to finish your round of golf. Make it a great time to think about your mental golf game, or spend time with your golf mates shooting the breeze.

Eat sensibly. Eat smaller meals and not as much protein. Protein increases metabolic rate, which makes staying cool more difficult. So, eat lighter meals, and include fruit and vegetables (which also help to hydrate you) and whole grain foods. You might also find that reducing the amount of dairy you consume, directly before you play golf or hit balls, might help you feel better.

It is important to recognize when you are overheated. Some of the signs of being overheated are: sweating profusely, increased heart rate, dizziness, headache, and vomiting.  If you experience any or many of these signs, it is important that you rest in a cool, shaded area, drink cool liquids, such as water or sports drinks, apply cool compresses, and avoid caffeine and alcohol.

Just because it’s hot, doesn’t mean it isn’t golf weather! Make these small changes and you will be ready to play, even in the heat. Be sure to pay attention to your body. If you need help, please ask. It’s better to be safe than sorry.

Here’s to another great summer at Cape May Par 3 & Dover Par 3!!

See you out on the course,

Rick Jones

Par3rick@aol.com

www.capemaypar3.com

www.doverpar3golf.com